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Weekly News: “About this advertiser” initiative now includes Advertisers Pages for Google Ads

“About this advertiser” initiative now includes Advertisers Pages for Google Ads

“To give users of our products even more transparency, we are enhancing ad disclosures with
new advertiser pages. Users can access these disclosures in our new ‘About this ad’ menu to
see the ads a specific verified advertiser has run over the past 30 days,” said Google in an announcement today.

As part of the company’s advertiser transparency initiative, Google Ads introduced their advertiser identity verification program as well as their “About this ad” information last year. The new Advertiser Page program takes that transparency for searchers to the next level.

Users can learn more about advertisers and report ad policy violations. “This transparency helps users learn more about the company behind a specific ad. It also helps differentiate credible advertisers in the ecosystem, while limiting the ability of bad actors to misrepresent themselves,” according to the announcement blog. Searchers can report any ad policy violations they believe an ad is breaching. From there a Google team member reviews it and takes the ad down if the violations are found to be true.

Read more: “About this advertiser” initiative now includes Advertisers Pages for Google Ads

Giving users more transparency into their Google ad experience

Today, people engage with a wider variety of ad formats on more Google products than ever before — from Video ads on YouTube to Shopping ads across Search, Display and more. And they increasingly want to know more about the ads they see. That’s why we’ve been innovating on features like “About this ad” to help users understand why an ad was shown, and to mute ads or advertisers they aren’t interested in.

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Last spring, we also introduced an advertiser identity verification program that requires Google advertisers to verify information about their businesses, where they operate from and what they’re selling or promoting. This transparency helps users learn more about the company behind a specific ad. It also helps differentiate credible advertisers in the ecosystem, while limiting the ability of bad actors to misrepresent themselves. Since launching the program last year, we have started verifying advertisers in more than 90 countries — and we’re not stopping there.

Introducing advertiser pages 

To give users of our products even more transparency, we are enhancing ad disclosures with new advertiser pages. Users can access these disclosures in our new “About this ad” menu to see the ads a specific verified advertiser has run over the past 30 days. For example, imagine you’re seeing an ad for a coat you’re interested in, but you don’t recognize the brand. With advertiser pages, you can learn more about that advertiser before visiting their site or making a purchase.

Improving transparency for ads on Google

Enhanced ad disclosures build on our efforts to create a clear and intuitive experience for users who engage with ads on Google products. More than 30 million users interact with our ads transparency and control menus every day, and “About this ad” has received positive feedback on its streamlined experience. Users engage with our ads transparency and control tools on YouTube more than any other Google product. To help our users make informed decisions online — no matter where they engage — we will roll out the “About this ad” feature to YouTube and Search in the coming months. 

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Read more: Giving users more transparency into their Google ad experience

Microsoft Advertising launches Marketing with Purpose Business attributes

Executing Marketing with Purpose in your advertising is an important way for marketers to overcome barriers in the moments that matter, and to connect with people.

New attributes from Microsoft Advertising allow businesses to indicate their dedication to “responsibility, how your brand values align with the values of your customers, and how your brand is being inclusive,” said an announcement from Vi Nguyen, Crystal Zhang, and MJ DePalma.

“Marketing with Purpose Business Attributes allow you to communicate quickly and easily how your brand is ‘for someone like me.’ They allow you to be authentic, which is the key attribute to building trust with customers,” said the blog.

Marketing with Purpose. This initiative is exclusive to Microsoft Advertising and follows the lead the company has taken with its Marketing with Purpose playbook and course. The idea behind the initiative is to “build a brand that’s welcomed into people’s lives by earning genuine trust, upholding their values, and inclusively advertising.”

Attributes included. The attributes advertisers can choose from fall under four main categories: inclusion, environmental, community/social responsibility, and accessibility. Within those categories, there are 32 attributes that a business can choose.

Read more: Microsoft Advertising launches Marketing with Purpose Business attributes

The greatest hidden cost to marketing success: Ineffective communication

Marketing leaders know that success today increasingly comes down to agility. Now more than ever, brands must quickly and compellingly engage audiences across a growing number of channels to drive results.

But one critical—and overlooked—factor hampers the ability to deliver on these goals: ineffective communication. When communications break down, it creates tremendous costs for marketing organizations by eroding engagement with customers and prospects, decreasing alignment around brand messaging and goals, and preventing productivity and growth. For example, even well before the pandemic, poorly written communication was costing businesses a staggering $400 billion annually in lost productivity.

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This is particularly true in functions like marketing that rely on clear, consistent, and engaging interactions and content to achieve outcomes. And now, new customer and workforce demands are amplifying the cost of poor communication on marketing teams—and the opportunity that awaits should they overcome it.

Read more: The greatest hidden cost to marketing success: Ineffective communication

“In a move away from last-click, data-driven attribution will soon be the default attribution model for all new Google Ads conversion actions,” tweeted Ads Liaison, Ginny Marvin on Monday morning. As Google works toward a move privacy-focused search experience for users, it’s also adjusting the available attribution models for advertisers.

“[Data-driven attribution] uses advanced machine learning to more accurately understand how each marketing touchpoint contributed to a conversion, all while respecting user privacy,” according to an announcement from Vidhya Srinivasan, VP/GM Buying, Analytics and Measurement, Google Ads.

How it works. “Data-driven attribution looks at all the interactions—including clicks and video engagements—on your Search (including Shopping), YouTube, and Display ads in Google Ads. By comparing the paths of customers who convert to the paths of customers who don’t, the model identifies patterns among those ad interactions that lead to conversions,” says the about page.

Read more: Google Ads announces machine learning-based data-driven attribution models in new privacy landscape

More news:

Mozilla tests Bing as the default search engine for 1% of users

Google News app will display non-AMP content

Google to enforce unique product identifiers on free merchant listings

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